Standards Portfolio

Select the standards below to learn more.

+ Standard One

1.1 Physical, social and intellectual development and characteristics of students
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of physical, social and intellectual development and characteristics of students and how these may affect learning.

Evidence: Differentiated lesson plan

Lesson Plan - Sell it to me!

Differentiated – Cognitive Development Delay

Rationale: This lesson forms part of a unit on persuasive writing and focuses on persuasive techniques used in advertising (ACELY1690), (ACARA, 2015).  This lesson will give students the opportunity to think about how the text and images in advertising have been carefully put together to persuade them to purchase a product or service and that these techniques are similar from those they have already used in their own persuasive writing.

The differentiated lesson for cognitive development delay was developed to help a student to gain an understanding of other people’s perspectives and through the lesson activity, gain an understanding of others thoughts and feelings.

The school has their Country Fete coming up next month and the students are having their own stall of home baked goods. The follow-up lesson will be to write the advertising for the stall, using the techniques and language of persuasive writing in advertising. 

Learning area(s): Literacy – Persuasive writing

Lesson format: Whole class intro, differentiated learning activity, whole class conclusion.

Time:  60minutes

Learning objectives

●      Identify characteristic features used in persuasive writing to meet the purpose of the text.

●      Show an understanding of persuasive language in advertising through creation of their advertisement.

●      Gain an appreciation of other people’s needs, desires and points-of-view when it comes to advertising and demonstrate this understanding.

Prior knowledge

●   Prior knowledge of persuasive writing

The learning environment

●    Classroom lesson.

Resources

●   Old magazines.

●   Scissors and glue.

●   A3 paper.

●   Pen.

Introduction & Motivation

●   Class teacher-led discussion on persuasive writing and advertising - as per the whole class lesson plan.

●   Ask student to stay sitting whilst the rest of the class begins their task.

●   Explain that the student will be approaching their advertisement a little bit differently.

Body of the lesson

●       Let the student know that the focus will be on the student’s ability to consider the viewpoints of others as well as their use of persuasive language in their writing. They are to choose 4 different people to cut from magazines.

●      Supply student with old magazine, A3 paper, scissors, glue and pen.

●      Scaffold student by asking prompting questions.

Concluding the lesson

●      Ask students to sit in a large circle and let the student know that if they haven’t finished they will get a chance in a later lesson.

●      Ask student to explain to the class what their task was present work.

●      Point out to the class persuasive language used and expressive vocabulary in their work.

●      Thanks the student for their good work.

●      Teacher can later display completed works in the classroom.

Evaluation/Follow up

●   The lesson went well and the students responded well to the activity. It is clear that there needs to be more work on these concepts.

 

 

Reflection

 

During my second professional experience, I had a student with a significant cognitive delay who needed help in understanding different points of view. By Year 4 student X should be progressing through Piaget’s Concrete Operational Stage of cognitive development (Eddy, 2010a).  Within this stage the child can understand principles of class inclusion, perspective tasks should become easier and children begin to understand that other people have different views to themselves (Eddy, 2010a). However, through observation of Student X in the classroom I have noticed he struggles with these concepts and his inability to view others thoughts and feelings, and therefore their understandings of the world. Student X shows a cognitive development delay of his theory of mind, his ability to attribute mental states, such as thoughts, knowledge, beliefs, emotions and desires, to oneself and others (Sodian & Kristen, 2010).  

Student X requires scaffolding to reach his Proximal Zone of Development (Eddy, 2010b). This scaffolding often takes place through questioning such as, “How do you think someone else may feel in the same situation?”  Without this scaffolding Student X is unable to complete tasks or join into discussions where other’s perspectives are shown.  

Student X’s inability to see others’ beliefs, emotions and desires has caused many disagreements in the classroom and can cause Student X to be left out by his peers.  His lack of decentration means he is unable to understand how others see the world and seeing how he differs from others, he demonstrates egocentrism, which should be decreasing at his age (Davies, 2010).

 

1.2 Understand how students learn
Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of research into how students learn and the implications for teaching.

Evidence: Using varied strategies for teaching geometry.

 Photo: Grade One using open-ended and varied geometry activities whilst learning about 2D shapes and their properties. Final professional learning. May 2018.

Photo: Grade One using open-ended and varied geometry activities whilst learning about 2D shapes and their properties. Final professional learning. May 2018.

Reflection

My mathematics unit on geometry contained ten lessons. Each of these lessons had set open-ended tasks making them achievable and allowing each student the chance to succeed. Each lesson followed an I do, we do, you do format where I would demonstrate something on the board or under the visualiser for all to see (using the geoboards for the first time), then we would do an activity together before the students went and completed tasks alone.

The students used concrete materials wherever possible and links to real-life examples to make the learning more meaningful for the students, for example in one lesson we went for a shape walk where the students looked around their school grounds for different shapes.  My class had very diverse learners with different learning styles (Gardner, 2008). My lessons where always visual, many of them had kinaesthetic elements, such as the shape walk, think boards were used so the students could draw their shapes, write the properties of their shape, write where they might see it in their world, and write or draw shapes with similar features. .

The unit began with an impress me activity where the students wrote down or drew everything they knew about shapes. This was a great diagnostic assessment as I could immediately see how much the students knew before beginning my geometry unit. In my final geometry lesson, the students completed another impress me activity, making it easy for me to see how much they have learned. It made me very proud of them and myself.

 

 

1.3 Students with diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds

Demonstrate knowledge of teaching strategies that are responsive to the learning strengths and needs of students from diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds.

Evidence: Student 360

Student360.jpg

Reflection:

On the Friday of my first week of placement, I set a task for the students to spend 15 minutes to complete a student 360 (Teachers Pay Teachers, 2017). This was given to each student as an A4 print-out for them to complete and hand back to me. As I was only with them for four weeks, and I needed to be teaching them, I needed to know who they were. Being able to see each student answers to the 360 gave me a deeper understanding of who they were, what their interests were, what their backgrounds were, whether they had access to computers at home, and what type of teachers they liked the most.

Although, the 360 gave me great insight into the students interests and backgrounds, I still needed to learn how to teach them and work out what strategies are most effective.  In dealing with students with diverse student populations, it is important to consider linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds that may influence their academic achievement. I believe, each student has the ability to learn, it’s just getting to know the students and the best way they learn that will lead to success. Throughout my placement I used inclusive language, open-ended tasks and questioning, I used real-world examples as often as possible, I encouraged collaborative learning, and I empowered students to be actively involved in their own learning. Cole (2008), suggests these pedagogical techniques and classroom applications in creating an inclusive learning experience for all students of all backgrounds.

In such a large class of grade 3\4, there was a wide range of abilities, with some students needing extra support and others needing extension.  To cater for this range of learners, I created my numeracy and literacy units using the pedagogical strategy of open-ended tasks, or low floor/ high ceiling (Boaler, 2016). These tasks allowed each student to enter at a level they were confident in and move up from there. I had confidence in my students that they could, and would achieve success. Cole (2008), states the importance of believing in students and not having low expectations of their ability, regardless of their backgrounds.

 

1.4 Strategies for teaching Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students

Demonstrate broad knowledge and understanding of the impact of culture, cultural identity and linguistic background on the education of students from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds.

Evidence: Health Unit Lesson Plans - Sugary Drinks

(Victoria Cancer Council, 2008).

ourmobissweet.jpeg

 

Link to unit: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1I9j39W11rJF3KjoHS-aqU8vrWlNl1Qd7/view?usp=sharing

 

Reflection

 

I compiled this unit to teach my students about the health effects of sugary drinks and to be more aware of how much sugar is in the drinks they consume. Through this unit of work, the students learn the importance of family and kinship structures for maintaining and promoting health within their community and wider community (ACARA, 2018). 

 

During my final professional experience, I designed and implemented effective teaching strategies that are responsive to the Indigenous students and community by using the 8 Ways of Aboriginal Learning Framework (Yunkaporta 2009). This student-centered pedagogy allowed me to understand the best way Indigenous students learn. This unit has a strong visual learning process through comparisons of drinks using real-life exemplar with the juice, lemonade and sugar that the students demonstrated to the class and hands-on reflective techniques when spooning the sugar onto the plates and considering the amount of sugar that is hidden in the drinks they consume and what would be a healthier alternative.  I also linked the lesson to community connectedness (Yunkaporta 2009) as high sugar consumption is a problem in Australia, but especially in Indigenous communities (Victoria Cancer Council 2018).

 

1.5 Differentiate teaching to meet the specific learning needs of students across the full range of abilities

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of strategies for differentiating teaching to meet the specific learning needs of students across the full range of abilities.

Evidence: Unit plan procedure writing with full differentiation in each lesson.

 

Link to unit: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1amtR3jdmdkeCN-wUW0j24C4yTJ01BZGD/view?usp=sharing

 

Reflection

 

Differentiated teaching instruction took place throughout my final professional placement. Once I had a good idea of each student’s abilities, I was able to create open-ended tasks and adjust my questioning for each student. Whole class instruction was always given, and differentiated tasks were set for different learning groups. For example, I completed a unit on procedural writing during my final professional experience and I would begin my lessons by explicit teaching of procedure writing as a whole class and then move into an activity. This was always the same activity with differentiated support provided by me or my mentor teacher to the groups who found the activity more challenging.

Tomlinson and Allan (2000) when differentiating suggest, teachers adapt what they plan for the students to learn or how the students will gain knowledge of the desired knowledge and understanding. If the success criteria was to write a procedure, using language features such as; title, materials, steps, I would set a task for the students that I knew were able to achieve success with a templated print-out of a procedure. The group that I knew may need a little more scaffolding, I filled in the materials and the first step of the procedure. My student with ASD received the procedure with an extra page that had all of the steps, but he needed to put them in order and put the numbered sequence alongside it. My student with Global Learning Delay, was given the procedure like everyone in the class, but I had the title, the materials listed, and the steps numbered. The challenge for him to succeed in the lesson, was to stick his steps beside the number he thinks it comes in the sequence of events. This activity would take place with my mentor teacher or with a teacher’s aide.

 

1.6 Strategies to support full participation of students with disability

Demonstrate broad knowledge and understanding of legislative requirements and teaching strategies that support participation and learning of students with disability.

Evidence: Mentor comment from final report.

 

Mentor comments: “The class Brooke is teaching in has a very diverse range of abilities, as do most classes in schools today. There is a student who is functioning 4 years below their age level ranging up to a student who is performing about two years above their age level.  Brooke has worked hard and sought advice in how to plan and meet the needs of all students.  It has been particularly pleasing to see her take on advice in regards to open ended tasks that enable students to show the depth of their understanding, as well as incorporate enabling prompts for the students who require this.   In Brooke’s final week it was pleasing to see her increased confidence in catering for all students through quality task design.  I encourage her to continue to hone her skills in this vital area of teaching.” (Michelle Wall, 2018).

Reflection

During my final professional experience at Mount Carmel College, I had a class with diverse learning needs, that included a student with ASD and a student with a Global Development Delay. This student functioned as a three-year-old and required scaffolding and support during each lesson. Each of my lesson had to give these students a chance to learn what my success criteria was, whether it be answering a question verbally rather than writing the answer, or drawing the features of a dinosaur, instead of writing it.

I taught a unit on procedural writing and during these lessons the introduction was delivered to the whole class, and the same task would be set for each student, although my student with ASD would have a partially completed procedure and would be required (with assistance from myself or teacher’s aide) to complete the procedure. Whereas my student with global learning delay would have the procedures steps prewritten and not in order. He would then cut the steps of the procedure out and paste them in sequenced order, this activity would be prompted by myself or the teacher’s aide.

 

+ Standard Two

 

2.1 Content and teaching strategies of the teaching area

 

Evidence: Powtoon I created for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) - Reduce, Reuse, Recycle

 

Reduce Pic.jpg

 

Video: https://youtu.be/a4ZT3BjZMz8

Reflection

 

During my second placement, I created this video clip as a part of an inquiry STEM unit on sustainability. Problem-based learning (Pbl) took place through watching the video clip that I created and brainstorming ideas about how we as a class could make a difference and creating a reuse solution to our plastics use.

The video introduced the students to the problem of plastics we use that pollute our environment and looking at ideas of ways we can try and solve the problem. The control was put in the students’ hands when we brainstormed ideas and came up with an idea as a class. The unit fostered curiosity amongst the students and enabled them to have hands-on learning through the collection and construction of our piece. Using the 4 C’s: 4 C’s: Creativity, Critical thinking, Collaboration and Communication (Dejarnette. 2016). The students were able to show their creativity through their ideas for the project and the initial design and then construction of their piece. The students used critical thinking when coming up with their idea and whilst designing and constructing they were able to think outside the square and think of ways to make it work or change ideas completely. They worked collaboratively to come up with the idea and to construct their piece and this was done through constant communication between the class and their peers and with me.

As a teacher, I believed in the students and their ideas for our project and transferred the control to them for the collection of plastic bottles in their own homes and the collaborative construction of their final piece. There were failures and challenges along the way, but this was all a part of the STEM learning process and through this process the students gained an understanding of perseverance and grit, making the final collaborative piece a real success.

 

2.2 Content selection and organisation
Organise content into an effective learning and teaching sequence.

 

 

Evidence: Unit Plan for Biological Science

Link to unit: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Z-09cjKgVCNYyODiMez-whAcQfGYK3Io/view?usp=sharing

 

Reflection

When choosing the content for my biological science unit on dinosaurs and their habitats, I followed the 5Es teaching and learning model. In the engage phase of the unit, I was able to work out the student’s prior knowledge and do diagnostic assessments. Moving onto the explore phase of the unit, the students began to have more hands-on, shared experiences of comparing dinosaur features to those of modern animals. Another activity that took part in the explore phase was a lesson where we looked at real ferns (kindly brought in by the prep teacher) and the students drew a labelled diagram of a fern and its features.

In the explain phase of the unit, the students were able to show me what they knew about dinosaurs and their features by making a model of a dinosaur. The elaborate phase was were the students created the habitat for their dinosaurs in the form of a shoe box diorama. The evaluate phase of the science unit saw the students being paleontologists and verbally describing their dinosaur and it’s features and describing the dinosaur’s habitat as part of our Science Expo.  

 

2.3 Curriculum, assessment and reporting
Use curriculum, assessment and reporting knowledge to design learning sequences and lesson plans.

Evidence: Unit plan for geometry showing curriculum addressed, assessment planned and form of reporting.

 

Link to unit: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1QTye9Lsqk6BAZ6eL5fpaJHFRCvoyJhc2/view?usp=sharing

 

Reflection

When designing my learning sequences and creating my lesson plans, I always began with looking at the curriculum and working out what it was that I wanted the students to learn. “With backward planning teachers establish outcomes, what they envision students are able to do and know as a result of the instruction and learning” (Wilson, 2009).

Once I had selected the course descriptors to address, I could then write the learning objectives. I used assessment for prior knowledge, so I knew which students may need more support and which students would need to be challenged. Assessment always aligned with my success criteria, which was visible to the students in every lesson and reporting took place in the form of a checklist and summative comments for each students and remarks on particular pieces of work they did.

 

2.4 Understand and respect Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to promote reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians

Demonstrate broad knowledge of, understanding of and respect for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, cultures and languages.

Evidence: Unit Plan- Indigenous Art.

Link to unit:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/12nqzKMFKnXTZ4gPCgmPQ0JWRLd0w_KMp/view?usp=sharing

 

Reflection

I designed and implemented this unit for visual art on Indigenous art with a focus on place/ country. When I planned this unit, I looked at ways I could use the 8 Aboriginal Ways of Learning Framework (Yunkaporta, 2009) and decided to focus mainly on links to the land. Each lesson began with an acknowledgment of country, and this was explained to the students

I explained why we do this, what is a traditional custodian, what is Aboriginal land, and why the school has always been on Aboriginal land. This sparked great interest and thinking amongst the students. I found the interactive map (Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies. 2017) was an effective tool for helping the students understanding of the original custodians of the land we were on and looking at other parts of Australia and the original people from those areas.

Land links (Yunkaporta, 2009) through place-based learning were also a focus when creating our collaborative Indigenous style art piece. We viewed Indigenous artworks and discussed the colours used and how the artists may have created those colours in nature. The students brought earth from their homes and we collected some earth from the school grounds and mixed it together with earthy tone paints to build a connection to the cultures of Indigenous art and people.

 

2.5 Literacy and numeracy strategies
Know and understand literacy and numeracy teaching strategies and their application in teaching areas.

 

Evidence: Geometry unit from my final professional experience – 2D shapes

Link to unit:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1QTye9Lsqk6BAZ6eL5fpaJHFRCvoyJhc2/view?usp=sharing

 

Reflection

 

Mathematics investigations for both my unit on 3D Shape in my second placement and 2D Shape in my third placement. I found that students responded well to the possibility of multiple approaches, multiple outcomes and multiple solutions that this open-ended task allows.  Through using this open-ended strategy, I was able to help students see the relevance of mathematics in their everyday lives. This strategy enables differentiation to take place, as students are able to engage in the investigation at any level they feel confident to.

My literacy unit on procedure writing followed an I do, we do, you do I began with explicit direct teaching of the language features of a procedure and the students watched me as I wrote a procedure on the whiteboard. We then moved to the we do stage where we wrote a collaborative procedure on the whiteboard. Toward the end of the literacy unit, the students were able to write their own procedure as an individual task, publish from a draft and present to the class.

 

2.6 Information and Communication Technology (ICT)

Implement teaching strategies for using ICT to expand curriculum learning opportunities for students

Evidence: Simple Machines Photo Story (Microsoft, 2016), created by a student.

Reflection:

Fortunately, my school had ratios of devices to students of 1:1 laptops and 2:1 iPads, so when designing this STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) task, so I knew that no students would be disadvantaged. The students showed confidence in using the technology and there was a real buzz amongst them when these were being used. Firstly, the students gathered photos using the iPad, from around the school that represented each simple machine, the students then uploaded the photos to laptops, where they created their photo story using Microsoft’s Photo Story (2006).  Because there was one iPad to two students, the students paired up for the photo collection, and once uploaded, the photos were shared using a USB drive.

“Functionality, access and efficacy (skills and confidence) are all necessary components that contribute to the success of ICT utilisation”, (Churchill, 2016). Therefore, before integrating ICT in the classroom, I considered what was required for everything to work, my rationale for using the particular ICT, and whether it was being used in a meaningful way. I knew the students had used the Photo Story (Microsoft, 2006), application before, so they had already developed ICT skills and knowledge in the software.

I used Twining’s (2002), computer practice framework, which conceptualises how to use computers in the classroom and considered the focus, referring to the objectives supported by computer use, and mode, referring to the impact of computer use on the curriculum.  In this STEM task, the ICT was used with a learning focus, through developing language skills, encouraging cooperation with other students, and to enhance confidence and motivation. I chose Photo Story (Microsoft, 2006), as a mode to transform the curriculum, the processes were different to what they would be if computers were not used.

+ Standard Three

3.1 Establish challenging learning goals

Set learning goals that provide achievable challenges for students of varying abilities and characteristics.

Evidence:  Students achieving their learning goals in my maths unit - Practicum B.

MathsUnit.jpg

Reflection:

The planning for my literacy and numeracy units began before my placement started when my mentor teacher emailed me, asking me to create a sequence of lessons for a 3D shape unit and a procedural writing unit. Firstly, I had think about what I wanted the students to learn, and then create the learning objectives for each lesson. To help me in constructing these I thought about what the most important concepts, ideas, or skills I wanted students to be able to grasp and apply. I then designed the specific tasks in each lesson, that would allow the students to show me what they understand and apply what they know.

The first lesson in the numeracy unit, was used as an assessment for learning to gage prior learning of the topic. The structure of lessons that followed all began with engaging introductions to stimulate interest and encourage thinking. I used real-world examples, practical application, probing questions, whole-class games, and short video clips to engage the students (Milkova, 2012).  The introductions were followed by a task. The lessons always ended with a conclusion, but this didn’t always get completed due to time management.

I sequenced the lessons using Robert Marzano’s, I do, we do, you do model (The Australian Society for Evidence Based Teaching, 2017). I began with teacher-led lessons, moving then to collaborative learning, and finally, with individual student-based learning resulting in their final projects, being the rotten recipe procedural writing for literacy, and the 3D avatar for numeracy. I had to teach my students how to write a procedure, before they could be creative and break a few rules, “before they can create the unexpected, they first need to be aware of what is the expected.” (Deriwianka & Jones, 2012).  I followed this constructivist approach as I thought the students needed to feel supported in their learning and slowly building their knowledge before showing me what they have learned.

3.2 Plan, structure and sequence learning programs

Plan lesson sequences using knowledge of student learning, content and effective teaching strategies.

Evidence:  Procedural writing unit: First lesson task and last lesson published work.

sequenceevidence.jpg

Reflection:

The planning for my literacy and numeracy units began before my placement started when my mentor teacher emailed me, asking me to create a sequence of lessons for a 3D shape unit and a procedural writing unit. Firstly, I had think about what I wanted the students to learn, and then create the learning objectives for each lesson. To help me in constructing these I thought about what the most important concepts, ideas, or skills I wanted students to be able to grasp and apply. I then designed the specific tasks in each lesson, that would allow the students to show me what they understand and apply what they know.

The first lesson in the numeracy unit, was used as an assessment for learning to gage prior learning of the topic. The structure of lessons that followed all began with engaging introductions to stimulate interest and encourage thinking. I used real-world examples, practical application, probing questions, whole-class games, and short video clips to engage the students (Milkova, 2012).  The introductions were followed by a task. The lessons always ended with a conclusion, but this didn’t always get completed due to time management.

I sequenced the lessons using Robert Marzano’s, I do, we do, you do model (The Australian Society for Evidence Based Teaching, 2017). I began with teacher-led lessons, moving then to collaborative learning, and finally, with individual student-based learning resulting in their final projects, being the rotten recipe procedural writing for literacy, and the 3D avatar for numeracy. I had to teach my students how to write a procedure, before they could be creative and break a few rules, “before they can create the unexpected, they first need to be aware of what is the expected.” (Deriwianka & Jones, 2012).  I followed this constructivist approach as I thought the students needed to feel supported in their learning and slowly building their knowledge before showing me what they have learned.

 

3.3 Use teaching strategies
Include a range of teaching strategies.

Evidence: Photo of my biological science unit- Dinosaurs and more.

IMG_5728.jpg

 

Reflection

 

Whilst in my geometry unit we worked on shapes as investigators, in my procedure writing unit we worked as authors and in my biological science unit we worked as palaeontologists. Scientific questioning and understanding were key point of assessment in this unit, so I would ask questions for the students to answer and they would have a chance to pose their own questions and make predictions about dinosaur features and their habitats.

The science unit followed the 5Es teaching and learning model. In the engage phase of the unit, I was able to work out the student’s prior knowledge and do diagnostic assessments. Moving onto the explore phase of the unit, the students began to have more hands-on, shared experiences of comparing dinosaur features to those of modern animals. Another activity that took part in the explore phase was a lesson where we looked at real ferns (kindy brought in by the prep teacher) and the students drew a labelled diagram of a fern and its features.

In the explain phase of the unit, the students were able to show me what they knew about dinosaurs and their features by making a model of a dinosaur. The elaborate phase was where the students created the habitat for their dinosaurs in the form of a shoebox diorama. The evaluate phase of the science unit saw the students being paleontologists and verbally describing their dinosaur and it’s features and describing the dinosaur’s habitat as part of our final science expo.

 

3.4 Select and use resources
Demonstrate knowledge of a range of resources, including ICT, that engage students in their learning.

Evidence: Coding video I created.

CodingPic.jpg

 

Video URL: https://youtu.be/yUuUn1RTkyc

 

Reflection

 

This short YouTube video introduces the concept of computer coding. The video covers the benefits of coding, what coding is used for, coding languages and provides examples of free coding websites for students to explore coding for themselves. I created this video for my grade one/two class as an introduction to coding before engaging the students in creating their own computer game. After the introduction video was shown on the interactive whiteboard, I showed the students the Flappy Bird coding game that we were going to use in the lesson. Many of the students were familiar with Flappy Bird and there was a buzz of excitement in the room.  In the computer lab each student had their own computer to work on, but as the lesson progressed I found students helping each other so they could all complete their games before we showed a couple of examples to the class.

Through the use of YouTube and the coding activity, the students felt connected, they were motivated to learn and engaged in their learning. This type of learning has real-world application and has meaning to young people. Through coding, they are learning computational thinking. “This is the most important skill that any child in the 21st Century could ever acquire, with the same life-skill significance as reading, writing and arithmetic” (Humble, 2017).

 

3.5 Use effective classroom communication
Demonstrate a range of verbal and non-verbal communication strategies to support student engagement.

Evidence: Photo of some of the ways I communicated with the students.

IMG_5730.jpg

 

Reflection

 

My mentor teacher already had her own ways of communicating with her students and thumbs up/ thumbs down/ thumbs sideways was used as an indicator of where the students were in their understanding of the lesson. From my observations during the first two days, I felt it would be something I would apply to my lessons too. My mentor teacher used it more during explicit whole-class teaching, but I found it a great communication tool during most of my lessons and even if I saw a student from across the room who was looking at me during an activity. I’d do thumbs up, thumbs down and thumbs sideways and the student would non-verbally reply, this was useful when I just wanted a quick check-in with students during lessons.

Verbal communication used to support student engagement were Hocus pocus, let’s focus and clapping to gain students attention. At the completion of a unit on 2D Shape I gave the students a chance to reflect on their own work and efforts. This was done using a simple table with a statement and three faces, one happy, one neither happy nor sad, and the third one was a sad face. This was used a form of non-verbal communication between myself sand the students, it also introduced the students to reflection tasks where they were looking at their own learning processes.

 

3.6 Evaluate and improve teaching programs

Demonstrate broad knowledge of strategies that can be used to evaluate teaching programs to improve student learning.

Evidence: Photo of my mentor’s observation book from my final professional experience.

IMG_5378.jpg

 

Reflection

 

Being on my professional experience meant I was evaluating and improving my teaching programs many times each day. My mentor teacher wrote her observations down in a book and we discussed them each day. In the book she wrote whet went well and what could be improved. I found this immensely helpful in improving my teaching.

The strategies I used during my three placements to evaluate teaching programs and improve student learning, were collaboration with other teachers, reflection at the end of each lesson and using my impress me activity at the beginning and at the end of my geometry unit gave me an amazing insight into how much the students had learned during the lesson and upon there were only a couple of lessons I would adjust in that unit.

 

3.7 Engage parents/ carers in the educative process

Describe a broad range of strategies for involving parents/carers in the educative process.

 

Evidence: Photo of parents visiting the classroom to learn about our science unit.

IMG_5687.jpg

 

Reflection

During my final professional teaching experience, I had many opportunities to meet the students’ parents and involve them in their children’s learning.  We had parent help in the classroom and on excursions and parents and friends were invited into the classroom on my last day to view the students wonderful work on dinosaurs and their habitats. The students were encouraged to describe their dinosaurs features and the features of their habitat to the parents as they viewed their dioramas.

I created a wall display that showed the parents what we had been learning in our geometry unit. The display was the students wanted posters, were they had to describe the shape using mathematical properties and then the person viewing tries to guess the shape before lifting a flap to reveal the shape. The students were very excited about the display and they had their parents come and guess their shape. I think the parents were very impressed about what their child knew about shapes.

 

+ Standard Four

4.1 Support student participation

Identify strategies to support inclusive student participation and engagement in classroom activities.

Evidence: The cup of opportunity, from my final professional teaching experience.

IMG_5703.jpg

 

Reflection

 

During my three professional teaching experiences, I have maintained a safe and supportive learning environment. A classroom where all students are personally welcomed each morning and shown empathy and respect. Each student in the class participates in the lessons through my questioning and through activities that are differentiated so every student has the chance to succeed.

I used strategies, such as, the cup of opportunity, or as some students named it, the cup of doom. This was a cup filled with icy pole sticks with each student’s name on it, and I used it when I asked questions in my lessons. The students sat still and waited for their name to be chosen and were always very engaged when this strategy was used. Using this way of choosing people, meant that each student would get a chance to answer a question or at least give it a go. At times I would use it before I had asked a question, so I could then tailor my question to the student’s ability.

 

4.2 Manage classroom activities
Demonstrate the capacity to organise classroom activities and provide clear directions.

 

Evidence: Mentor comment from final professional experience.

“Brooke has shown significant growth in all areas of her teaching during this 4 week practical.  It is never easy to come into someone else’s classroom and have to conform to the routines and structures in place, however, Brooke did this seamlessly.  With support, she developed better classroom management techniques, organised effective grouping and rotations of these groupings during the literacy block as well as plan 3 units (persuasive writing, geometry and biological science) as comprehensively as possible to ensure student learning was supported and maximised”.

 

Reflection

Each morning of my final professional experience, I taught the literacy lesson that made up the entire morning block. We began the block by explicit teaching of a text type, predominately recount and procedural writing. I then grouped the students into three groups and they rotated through a spelling activity, a writing activity and quiet reading that could be done using RazKids on the iPads or quiet reading of a book from their reading boxes. The iPads had to be taken off the charges in the prep room and brought into the grade one room, before school starting so the lesson wasn’t disrupted by students going in and out of the classroom.

Each activity was timed to 20 minutes and I would let the students know when they had five minutes to complete their activity before they moved onto another, and when 20minutes was up, they would pack their work away and move to the next activity. My mentor teacher has these rotational activities in place, making the organisation easier for me.

 

4.3 Manage challenging behaviour

Demonstrate knowledge of practical approaches to manage challenging behaviour.

Evidence: Traffic Lights

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Reflection:

In a classroom of fifty students, during each lesson there was low-level disruptions, such as chatting, rocking on chairs, but the more challenging behaviours were students refusing to do set tasks and physical violence. Through my observations of my mentor teacher’s behavioural management skills, I was able to build on my own. It was difficult to manage behavior in such a large class and until I got to know the students and their names at the very least, I couldn’t expect them to immediately show respect to me and the class, without me giving it back.

For everyday classroom behavioural management, I created some traffic lights that I displayed at the front of the classroom. All the students’ names were sitting on the green light and would move to orange if they disrupted the class and then to red if they continued. Once on the red, the students would then have to stay with me at recess or lunch time. My mentor teacher advised me to reinforce my non-negotiables and mention them during each lesson. I aligned my non-negotiables with the school “We are Safe, Fair and Respectful Learners” values (Albuera Street Primary School, 2017), resulting in any behaviour that is unsafe, unfair, or disrespectful to be addressed.  These shared values are strategically constructed to improve learning, wellbeing and behaviour, and the conditions that support these.

More challenging behaviours, such as the student who would plainly refuse to do of lesson tasks and spend his time making paper airplanes, could not be addressed using a tool such as the traffic lights. It really worried me that this student’s behavior would greatly disadvantage him and his ability to learn and achieve success. My mentor teacher and I both thought this boy had Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD), but his parents refused to have him accessed. In this case, threats and punishments would go nowhere and he was more likely to respond to encouragement and praise, (Bennett, 2010).  Although I didn’t see any behavioural changes whilst I was in the classroom, I hope he will remember me, for the effort I put in, and as someone who believed in him.

 

4.4 Maintain student safety
Describe strategies that support students’ wellbeing and safety working within school and/or system, curriculum and legislative requirements.


Evidence: Photos of Buddy System Excursion to University of Tasmania’s Art School. August, 2017.

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Reflection

 

When students feel connected to their school and have positive and respectful relationships with their peers and their teachers, they feel confident socially and emotionally. During all of my three school placements I have seen many different ways that schools promote well-being and safety. During my second placement I really enjoyed the connection the grade three and fours had with the kindergarten students. This was the buddy system set-up by the teachers of the kindergarten students and the teachers of the grade three/ fours, to create friendships between the older students and the younger students. This approach fosters a positive whole-school community where the students feel supported and included.

“Buddy systems can create feelings of connectedness that enable both older and younger ‘buddies’ to bond more closely with their school within a psychologically safe environment, thereby increasing the likelihood of more positive school behaviour and less bullying or unacceptable behaviour” (Alannah & Madeline Foundation, 2010).

The school where I completed my final placement focused on restorative practices to respond to incidents of bullying and unacceptable behaviour as a way to heal harm to relationships. This practice was a whole-school approach to conflict resolution and problem-solving. Through small group conferences where a group of students or just an individual student talk through an incident or problem that arise; classroom conferences where we addressed issues that affected the students well-being as a class and community conferences that were conducted by a school facilitator and bring together the wrongdoer and the student on the receiving end, as well as their families.

 

4.5 Use ICT safely, responsibly and ethically
Demonstrate an understanding of the relevant issues and the strategies available to support the safe, responsible and ethical use of ICT in learning and teaching.

Evidence: Photo of my learning intentions and success criteria displayed on the Smart Board.

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Reflection

 

During my final professional experience, I was fortunate enough to have varied access to ICT in the classroom. For all of my lessons I used the Smart Board, to show my success criteria and learning intentions so they were visible for all of the students during the lesson and as a place to reflect on the lesson to see what they had been learning. When I used the Smart Board to show short video clips, I made sure the links were safe using software that made sure there were not advertisements, or the video didn’t move onto another video that may have been inappropriate.

The visualiser was also a fantastic ICT tool for showing students examples of other students work, either during a lesson to keep students on the right track, or at the end of a lesson to show who had successfully met the success criteria set out for the lesson.

 

+ Standard Five

5.1 Assess student learning
Demonstrate understanding of assessment strategies, including informal and formal, diagnostic, formative and summative approaches to assess student learning.

 

Evidence: Mentor comment from my final professional experience.

 

Mentor comments: Many discussions were held in regard to providing feedback and assessing of students throughout each unit.  Brooke was supported to develop effective proforma’s on which to record student progress. At the conclusion of the practical teaching period Brooke provided informative feedback to me on each student based on their body of work including formative and summative tasks.  She highlighted a specific piece of work that showed an interesting piece of information or good insight into their understanding. Pleasingly, she also used oral recordings to determine students with low literacy skills or students who had missed parts of the unit due to absences to determine their understandings of the content taught. Accurate assessment of students learning prior to commencing and at the end of the unit cannot be understated nor can the value of formative, constructive feedback during a unit. As her prac progressed Brooke realised that in an early years classroom the majority of feedback needs to be instantaneous and is often verbal in nature (Michelle Wall, 2018).

 

Reflection

 

I began my unit on shapes by creating an impress me print-out for each student. I then asked them to impress me by writing down everything they know about shapes. This diagnostic assessment for learning strategy allowed me to access individual knowledge and having this initial information would determine my unit planning. Assessment in the classroom is essentially about setting up a dialogue between myself and the students. A way for the students to provide evidence of what they can do and of understandings they have constructed, leaving the teacher to provide feedback that guides their further learning (Callingham, 2008).

I knew what I wanted the students to learn by the end of the unit, and my learning intention and success criteria were always discussed in each lesson and written on the whiteboard, so the students could see if throughout the lesson. I used the impress me print-out again as a formative assessment of learning at the end of my unit. It was clear the students had knowledge of the features of shapes, the names of shapes and were able to use correct mathematical language whilst impressing me.

 

5.2 Provide feedback to students on their learning
Demonstrate an understanding of the purpose of providing timely and appropriate feedback to students about their learning.

Evidence: Photo of my written feedback on students work, final professional experience.

 

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Reflection

 

Providing timely and appropriate feedback to students about their learning is essential for you and the students. It provides them with an idea as to whether they are on the right track and if not, what they need to improve on. I would deliver feedback to each student whilst roaming the room during an activity. The feedback provided would be in manageable units so not to threaten the learners self-esteem, it would be specific and clear and always encouraging.

Churchill et al. (2016), state that effective feedback allows the teacher to know what they have accomplished to date and where they need to go next, it is a tool to move learning forward. Effective teachers also understand that assessment is the bridge between their teaching and learning.

 

5.3 Make consistent and comparable judgements

Demonstrate understanding of assessment moderation and its application to support consistent and comparable judgements of student learning.

 

Evidence: Photo of moderation in process for my geometry unit.

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Reflection

 

Looking at the same four pieces of students work and from these, gaining an understanding of what is exemplary, what is around average and what shows a student that is struggling. My mentor teacher and I went through work samples to moderate which samples showed each of these abilities and from this point, I was able to make assessments for my units.

“At the completion of these units Brooke underwent the process of moderation of a body of work to provide accurate and detailed assessments of each students learning.  This is an important skill to develop and Brooke did this well after some initial guidance.  I congratulate her on this” (Michelle Wall, 2018).

I found the process of moderating and its application to support consistent and comparable judgements of student learning, quite challenging and time consuming but now realise that if my success criteria is always clear to the students then they will know what I am looking for in their work and when it comes to moderation I will be able have a checklist to help me grade comparably.

 

5.4 Interpret student data
Demonstrate the capacity to interpret student assessment data to evaluate student learning and modify teaching practice.

 

Evidence: Mentor comment.

“Brooke used formative and summative assessment practises during her 4 weeks with us. She developed and used a rubric to support students to self-assess and peer assess their work on 3D shape. She held individual student assessment conferences and provided timely feedback to students about their work. Brooke used the QLD assessment rubric for the Australian Curriculum to assess procedure writing against the 3/4 statement of achievement.  Brooke conducted a pre-assessment which she used to group her class into ability levels, allowing her to more explicitly target the needs of each student” (Beth Vince, 2017).

 

Reflection

 

During my placements I have conducted assessments to collect data on students’ knowledge and abilities. I have then used this data to direct my lessons and to determine learning groups. The data I collected was recorded using my mentor teachers Microsoft Excel spreadsheet. This software allowed us to see the data represented in tables and graphs, making it easier for us to recognise patterns that may suggest changes in pedagogy needed to meet the learning needs of all learning groups. It was also clear to see individual students that needed extra support and students that could be extended in future lessons.

 

During my second placement I was privileged to be a part of a special teachers meeting to discuss Naplan results. During this meeting, we discussed where the students were in comparison to other schools around Australia. During this meeting, the teachers were able to see gaps in learning areas and begin discussing ways to improve student learning.

 

 

5.5 Report on student achievement

Demonstrate understanding of a range of strategies for reporting to students and parents/carers and the purpose of keeping accurate and reliable records of student achievement.

Evidence: Rubric

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Reflection:

The rubric helped me cut down time when assessing the students and also provided fuller feedback, compared to a summative assessment. Although the rubric took some time to construct, I was able to have it in front of me during the students’ presentations of their 3D shape avatars and circle the appropriate category. Using the rubric also meant I could give the students their assessment feedback within a day or two of their presentation, so the memory of the project was still fresh in their heads. Rucker and Thomson (2003), study of 104 students concluded that time was a major factor in making feedback meaningful and useful for students. Feedback was more effective when given as soon as possible after task completion in helping students make positive changes in their subsequent work.

The project was a complex one, involving integrated tasks that resulted in the 3D avatar. Stephens and Levi (2013), state that the use of rubrics when reporting on student achievement, for these types of projects is the most effective way to assess, as it communicates all the varied expectations easily and clearly. Through the use of the rubric for assessment I was able to see where the gaps in my teaching and thus, the students learning, were and this information could be used in my future unit planning to therefore make my teaching more effective.  

+ Standard Six

6.1 Identify and plan professional learning needs

Demonstrate an understanding of the role of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers in identifying professional learning needs.

Evidence: Positive Norms, used to learn mathematical mindsets.

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Reflection:

My entire placement was identifying and planning my professional needs, but one information session stands out for me because it changed my thinking in such a positive way. The session was for all teachers at the school and collaboratively we looked at mathematical mindsets and how we can learn more about these to improve numeracy outcomes. Collaboratively we looked at ways to incorporate mathematical mindset growth strategies into the classroom. Each teacher in the group received a copy of the book, Mathematical Mindsets (Boaler, 2016). The teacher leading the information session, introduced the book and the concept of mathematical mindsets, being a growth mindset instills the belief that everyone can learn mathematics to the highest level and mistakes are valuable.

I find this area of study fascinating and have become interested how students develop fixed mindsets and how teachers can encourage students to believe in themselves. As teachers we need to nurture a growth mindset, where students believe they can learn anything, and through hard work they will improve their maths. The students with a growth mindset take on hard work, and they view mistakes as challenges and motivation to do more.

We needed to look at ways in which we, as teachers, can help the students know that they have vast mathematical potential and we need to learn to instruct in a way that brings this belief to life. Some strategies discussed were, through language, such as, praising what students have done and learned, not them as a person. So instead of saying “you are so clever”, say “it’s great that you have learned that.” When students make mistakes, we needed to use encouraging language, such as “working hard grows your brain”, and “it’s important to make mistakes, it’s how we learn”.

To help improve mathematical outcomes, positive norms were then introduced to the classroom (Boaler, 2016), and a poster was printed for each classroom. It was obvious that all the teachers in the information setting left the room feeling excited about their professional learning and ready to encourage growth mindsets in mathematics and across all teaching and learning. I felt like I had a completely different view of mathematics pedagogy and my personal mindset of my personal abilities in the subject. Since this information session, I have used these positive norms to encourage students in mathematics, and throughout all lessons, I even use these strategies with my own children at home.

6.2 Engage in professional learning and improve practice

Understand the relevant and appropriate sources of professional learning for teachers.

Evidence: Sue Larkey Certificate of Participation: Teaching and Behavioural Support Strategies for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

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Reflection

 

During my final professional experience, my mentor teacher recommended I attended professional learning on ASD, as I would have two students in my class that were on the spectrum. In my previous placements, students with ASD had their own teacher’s aids that adjusted the lesson to suit the student. As such, I needed to gain more of an understanding of Autism, how the students learn and what strategies I will need. 

My mentor teacher recommended Sue Larkey as a great resource for learning about ASD, so I took part in Teaching and Behavioural Support Strategies for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder course. Through the course I learned important information that helped me greatly. Such creating a student outline to refer to as a quick reference, a place I could check for what the triggers for meltdowns are, the students challenges during their school day and their interests to help me make their learning more meaningful to them.

When looking around for other professional learning opportunities, I went through the Department of Education Tasmania’s Professional Learning Institute (2018) website and Australian Council for Educational Research (2018), where I found many appropriate courses that I would love to attend in the future.

 

6.3 Engage with colleagues and improve practice
Seek and apply constructive feedback from supervisors and teachers to improve teaching practices.

 

Evidence: Hand-out from one of my teacher meetings during my final professional teaching experience.

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Reflection:

 

During my three placements I attended and participated in all teacher meetings. In my final professional learning experience, the teachers’ meetings were filled with professional learning opportunities with focuses on success criteria and learning intentions, and giving student feedback, as well as making the learning relevant. The teacher who ran this meeting provided everyone with links to journal readings for each of the covered topics. I have been referring to these articles during my final professional teaching experience and found them immensely informative.

I received feedback from my mentor teacher and used that feedback to improve my teaching. The prep teacher in the classroom next to mine, was a great help with feedback. We would run lesson ideas by each other and give each other feedback and then follow-up after we had taken the lessons.

 

6.4 Apply professional learning and improve student learning

Demonstrate an understanding of the rationale for continued professional learning and the implications for improved student learning.

Evidence: Cerificate of professional Learning, Literacy for All.

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Reflection:

During my final professional experience, I was constantly applying my professional learning and improving student learning. I was lucky enough to attend a professional learning workshop on teaching literacy to meet diverse student needs. After the workshop I used the questioning strategies that I had learned in the classroom and found them really effective for inclusion and adapting questioning to the student’s ability. I have a natural love of learning and have always been learning something in my life. I now, more than ever, know how important life-long learning and developing is vital for the role of a teacher.

 

During my professional experience my mentor teacher was fantastic at giving me really constructive feedback and was happy when she saw me using that feedback and improving student learning, especially with my Autism Spectrum Disorder and Global Learning Delay students. Over the next few months, whilst I wait for my teaching registration to arrive, I will be continuing my professional learning by taking part in workshops and online seminars to add to my resume.

 

 

 

 

+ Standard Seven

7.1 Meet professional ethics and responsibilities
Understand and apply the key principles described in codes of ethics and conduct for the teaching profession.

7.1 Meet professional ethics and responsibilities

 

Evidence: Mentor teacher comments.

 

Mentor comments: In a short span of time Brooke established professional relationships with the parents of the students. She maintained a professional standard in her dress and interactions with both parents and colleagues at all times.  During the two parent/teacher sessions Brooke attended she gained an insight in to how to maintain a professional but empathetic relationship with parents especially when discussing difficulties a student with a specific diagnosis has educationally.

As part of Brooke’s placement she assisted in organising an excursion and now has a better understanding of the detailed processes required, particularly in reference to risk assessments, when undertaking an excursion to supplement and enhance the curriculum (Michelle Wall, 2018).

 

 

Reflection

 

During my final professional experience, I was involved in creating the risk assessments for our excursion, I mirrored by mentor teachers yard duty, I completed attendance each day and transitioned the students from the classroom to the yard and back again each recess and lunch. I was also responsible for transitioning the students from the classroom to the music room, library and to assembly and back. At all times in or out of the classroom, I had the students’ safety as paramount.

Throughout my final professional experience, I treated all staff, students and family with absolute respect and I was treated the same way. I understood the importance of my role as a teacher and the immense responsibility involved in the profession. I am a mother of three, so I am well aware of the worry you have once you leave your child in another’s care. I was always there for the students and they approached me with anything and everything.

 

7.2 Comply with legislative, administrative and organisational requirements

Understand the relevant legislative, administrative and organisational policies and processes required for teachers according to school stage.

Evidence:  Photo collage of roll call, excursion notice sent to parents,  and me on excursion.

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Reflection:

During my placement, I engaged professionally with colleagues, parents/carers and the community through attended all teacher meetings, daily yard duty, taking the roll daily and following the administrative and organisational requirements of my school during school excursions.  My mentor teacher said in my final report,

“Brooke has worked to begin to develop appropriate relationships with parents and other members of our community. This was particularly evident on the 3 excursions she completed during her time. Brooke completed the attendance when required using the appropriate means to ensure they were compliant with school requirements. Brooke adhered to confidentiality responsibilities when learning about our student’s backgrounds, and when speaking with other students, staff and parents” (Beth Vince, 2017).

As mentioned, we went on three excursions so I had numerous opportunities to be a part of the administrative and organisational requirements required for these to take place. A highlight of my time was our excursion to Molesworth Environmental Centre (Molesworth Primary School, 2017). Here the double class enjoyed hands-on activities and challenges where they needed to work as a team to complete tasks. A week before the excursion, I was involved in creating the notice for parents, and on the day, I was a part of completing the risk assessment report and taking roll call in the morning, whilst boarding the bus and again when we left the excursion to head back to school.

7.3 Engage with the parents/carers
Understand strategies for working effectively, sensitively and confidentially with parents/carers.

Evidence: Introduction to parents

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Reflection

 

On the first day of my final placement I sent home an introduction flyer to all the parents. This flyer introduced myself and let them know that I would be in their child’s classroom for the next four weeks and invited any parents to ask me questions. I wanted build parents confidence in me.

Research show that continuous positive communication between families and schools is necessary for student success, and greatly increases student motivation to learn (Gonzalez-DeHass and Holbein, (2005).  Throughout my final professional experience, I have had numerous opportunities to demonstrate the importance of engaging with parents and carers including, notes to parents, invitations to an exhibition and I have used the class Facebook page to increase parental involvement. During my final professional experience, I also gained insight into how to maintain a professional but empathetic relationship with parents especially when discussing difficulties, a student with a specific diagnosis has educationally.

 

7.4 Engage with professional teaching networks and broader communities

Understand the role of external professionals and community representatives in broadening teachers’ professional knowledge and practice.

 

Reflection:

Photo collage of our science expo.

 

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During my final professional experience, I taught a unit on biological science, focussing on dinosaurs and their habitats. This was a four-week unit and at the completion of this, I invited the students family and friends to come and view their work in a classroom exhibition. This exhibition gave myself and the students the chance to show what they have been learning over the four weeks I was teaching them. There was an amazing turn out and the principle also stopped by to view the dioramas that the students were so proud of.

Along with colleagues, parents and the wider community, I was made aware of many professional organisations and specialist resources, such as Sue Larkey (n.d) for ASD learning and resources, The Australian Association of Mathematics Teachers (AAMT) (n.d.), The Primary English Teaching Association (PETA)(2018), and I continued using Jo Boaler’s (2015) growth mindsets in mathematics when teaching.